View Point


Outtakes 163

View Point

By Cait Collins

 

It is possible to write two novels about the same incident, but from two different points of view. Bothe stories are valid. The hero in the first book is the villain in the second, and the villain becomes the hero. The disadvantages each man perceives regarding his plight are unknown to the other. It makes for interesting reading.

Here’s an assignment. The hero and the heroine have a lover’s quarrel. Write the scene from the heroine’s view point. What started the argument? Who became defensive first? Who initiated the fight? Pay particular attention to her hurts and disappointments. What is she not saying?

Now write the same scene from the hero’s point of view. What is different? What is similar? What is he hiding? Who stands between them? Is he defensive or placating? Can they resolve the issues?

Read both stories aloud. Are the results thought provoking enough for you take the scenes and develop a short story or novel?

Half Price Books



Half Price Books

By Natalie Bright

Voted best bookstore in Dallas/Fort Worth by viewers of WFAA-TV Channel 8, and voted best bookstore in Dallas by Nickelodeon Parent’s Pick, Half Price Books has always been a must stop every time we journey to Dallas. I remember our first experience there many years ago when my oldest was struggling to find reading material that would hold his interest so he could pass middle school Accelerated Reading. His teacher offered to give him credit based on the nonfiction books he read, after she looked them over. Upon the advice of my cousin, I turned him loose in Half Price Books. He discovered the military history section and passed AR that year.

Half Price Books – Flagship- Dallas, Texas

A converted Laundromat was the location of the first Half Price Books in 1972. Stocked with over 2,000 titles from the personal collections of co-founders Ken Gjemre and Pat Anderson, it has grown to stores in 16 states offering used books, music, movies and games. The simple philosophy of offering “a great product at a great price” continues under Pat’s daughter, Sharon Anderson Wright.

A recent trip to the Dallas area to visit family included a stop at the Half Price Book main store. I love digging through stacks of old, dusty books, but this isn’t your typical used book store. It’s clean, modern, and very well organized by genre with clearly marked sections by topic and alphabetized by author. “Preserving and recycling resources and entertainment of every form is our business“, and everything is half the publisher’s price or less.

As a children’s author, I particularly appreciate the Newberry Award section where I can find treasures for a few bucks. Featuring both medaled and honor awarded stories, these classics provide invaluable material for the study of story craft.

Classify yourself as a book hoarder? Bring a few books with you and leave with cash. The Coffee Shop and pastry was a delicious diversion too.

www.hpb.com for more information about Half Price Books.

 

 

Who Am I?


POST CARDS FROM THE MUSE

 

Who Am I?

By Nandy Ekle

 

I am a writer. I’ve always been a writer and I always will be. Sometimes I have periods where I cannot write my stories fast enough. The words parade through my head like raindrops in a storm. There are times when I hear the characters talking but my hands pause long enough that the words melt away like snowflakes on a not quite cold enough sidewalk. And then are the days when the characters are quiet.

These days are the reason for my day job. And what is my day job? Well, I’m a writer. I’m part of the correspondence department of a major world wide corporation. Granted, this is a different type of writing than the story telling I do after hours. But it is writing, just the same.

I open a letter from a client and the first thing I have to do is read their request, or their concerns. I notice the appearance of the letter, the handwriting, the typing font, the spelling and grammar. What is their voice? Most of the letters I answer are from the elderly, their family, or attorneys. The next step is to analyze what they are saying. Do they need help, information, confirmation, or do they need to be comforted and soothed?

Next, I try to find out why they need what they are asking for. Sometimes their reasons for contacting our company determines how we will answer them. Then I compose the company’s response.

I’ve trained several people for this job and one of the first things I tell a rookie is that each case is a new story. You have to find out where we are, how we got here, and where we go next. This is why I love to write.

Balance


Outtakes 162

Balance

By Cait Collins

 

Have you ever played Jenga? Players take turns removing one block at a time from a tower constructed of 54 blocks. The removed blocks are placed on top of the structure making a taller but less stable tower. The person who topples the tower loses. It’s really tricky and lots of fun. But there is a point. Keeping the tower upright is a matter of balance.

A writer’s life definitely needs balance. We build a tower one brick at a time and often do not realize how unstable the structure really is. We pile jobs on top of family obligations, add social commitments, kid’s activities, friends, writing assignments, social media, deadlines, editing, new creative, submissions, marketing, and pretty soon the house of cards is endanger of collapse. Every layer is necessary, but how do we manage to maintain balance and sanity?

I say we take a page from traditional housewives’ books. My mother managed get a husband and six kids out of bed each morning, fix breakfast, find lost socks, book bags, and homework, get Dad off to work and kids to school before having a cup of coffee. She made lunch, cleaned house, washed and ironed clothes, fixed dinner, cleaned the kitchen, helped with homework. She was the first one up in the morning and the last to go to bed at night. Everything worked. Her trick — planning and time management.

Writers need a plan. A good calendar is a must for keeping track of obligations and deadlines. I prefer a Daytimer, but some of my friends are more comfortable with an electronic organizer. Be sure to note all commitments, and never promise to do something before consulting your “secretary”.

Learn to say no. We get ourselves in trouble when we overbook or take on a project that does not help our work or capture our interest. We regret saying yes, but felt guilty saying no. If no is too difficult, try declining for now and ask for a rain check.

Honor deadlines and promises. Even when it’s difficult to get the job done, failure to keep commitments makes the writer appear unreliable.

Make time for you. A few minutes each day dedicated to yourself clears the head and allows you to be more focused and productive.

Prioritize. If you can put it off until tomorrow, do it. Take care of today, today.

Work hard, but balance work with play. Family and friends miss you when you over do it.

Know when to stop. Creative efforts are not well served when you are exhausted.

Balancing work with everyday life makes a writer more creative and a better all round person. It allows him to focus on the job without sacrificing life.

Half Price Books



Half Price Books

By Natalie Bright

Voted best bookstore in Dallas/Fort Worth by viewers of WFAA-TV Channel 8, and voted best bookstore in Dallas by Nickelodeon Parent’s Pick, Half Price Books has always been a must stop every time we journey to Dallas. I remember our first experience there many years ago when my oldest was struggling to find reading material that would hold his interest so he could pass middle school Accelerated Reading. His teacher offered to give him credit based on the nonfiction books he read, after she looked them over. Upon the advice of my cousin, I turned him loose in Half Price Books. He discovered the military history section and passed AR that year.

Half Price Books – Flagship- Dallas, Texas

A converted Laundromat was the location of the first Half Price Books in 1972. Stocked with over 2,000 titles from the personal collections of co-founders Ken Gjemre and Pat Anderson, it has grown to stores in 16 states offering used books, music, movies and games. The simple philosophy of offering “a great product at a great price” continues under Pat’s daughter, Sharon Anderson Wright.

A recent trip to the Dallas area to visit family included a stop at the Half Price Book main store. I love digging through stacks of old, dusty books, but this isn’t your typical used book store. It’s clean, modern, and very well organized by genre with clearly marked sections by topic and alphabetized by author. “Preserving and recycling resources and entertainment of every form is our business“, and everything is half the publisher’s price or less.

As a children’s author, I particularly appreciate the Newberry Award section where I can find treasures for a few bucks. Featuring both medaled and honor awarded stories, these classics provide invaluable material for the study of story craft.

Classify yourself as a book hoarder? Bring a few books with you and leave with cash. The Coffee Shop and pastry was a delicious diversion too.

www.hpb.com for more information about Half Price Books.

 

 

Drawing Sounds


POST CARDS FROM THE MUSE

 

Drawing Sounds

By Nandy Ekle

 

Several years ago (ten? fifteen?) We watched a movie called The 13th Warrior. Made from a book by Michael Crichton, it’s the story of an Arabian man who was exiled for having an affair with the wife of an influential noble. He is sentenced to be an ambassador to Northern Barbarians and through a series of events, he is banded with a tribe of Norse Warriors.

In the beginning of the story language is a curious barrier. He wants to understand the culture, but without understanding the language he cannot learn about their way of life.

He tells of traveling with these strangers and paying close attention to the sounds they make until their language begins to make sense to him. Today we call that immersion learning. As he begins to learn their tongue, they are also learning about him. Finally all the fog is cleared and they can then understand each other.

The main character is an educated man, while the Norsemen, one of them a king in waiting, are not. So once they are able to cross the language barrier, they all become friends and the young king in waiting asks a very interesting question.

“Can you draw sounds?”

Of course, he is asking if the ambassador can write. The Norseman wants to learn to read and write.

All these years later I still remember that question. Can you draw sounds.

If you think about it deeply enough you realize that all a spoken language is is sounds that we have assigned ideas to. Each sound is part of a bigger sound we call a word. When we write words we are writing symbols assigned to those sounds. Learning a new language is simply reassigning those symbols to different sounds.

As a student of court reporting and shorthand, I had to learn, in a sense, a different language. Well, it was the same sounds representing the same ideas, but the written symbols were different. And actually, the type of shorthand I learned was the same symbols, just in different orders.

Then I make myself even dizzier by wondering who decided which symbol would represent which sound? This line of thinking can go on and on and on . . .

This is one of the things I love about words.

Congratulations. You have just received a post card from the muse.

A Couple of Things


Outtakes 161

 

A Couple of Things

By Cait Collins

 

As I have mentioned often, I am a dinosaur when it comes to computers. When I find a system I like and works well for me, I keep it. Last week when my favorite laptop developed a problem, I panicked. Fearing the worst, I took my system to the computer store I use for a diagnosis of the problem. The tech gave me the good news first. My computer booted up properly, but the screen did not come on. He plugged in an external monitor and he could see the log on screen. So the screen was dead. The bad news, it was fixable but it would cost about $325.00.

I had a choice; I could repair my system or buy a new unit. A new unit meant Windows 8 or an Apple system. An Apple computer maybe, but I refuse to buy another computer with Windows 8. I bought a new Netbook with Windows 8 and I hate it. The tiles are a waste of my time and the computer’s memory. I find it difficult to navigate, and it continually rejects my passwords.

“Fix it,” I stated.

He reminded me I could buy a new system for a little more than the cost of the repairs.

“I do not want 8.”

He smiled and told me he had systems with Windows 7. I looked at one of his systems and was impressed, but to get what I wanted would cost about 3times the cost of a new computer screen. I love my computer. So I chose to get a new screen.

The point is I can still buy the operating system I like. I may have to look for it, but it’s out there. And your favorite computer tech just might be a good place to start.

As much as I dislike my new Netbook, I must make friends with it. Imagine my surprise when I learned our local community college was offering four, four hour sessions introducing new owners to Windows 8. For $25.00 someone will walk me through the maze of Windows 8. I’m signing up.

Community colleges are an excellent place to pick up new skills or fulfill a business educational need. Our college offers classes for the general public as well as special programs for children and seniors. The costs are reasonable and continuing education credits are available for many courses. I have taken a number of classes to up-grade my computer skills; work with published authors, or to just learn something different. I check out their course schedule before each fall and spring session. I recommend your community college for continuing education offerings.

Think About It and Become Inspired


Think About It and Become Inspired

By Rory C. Keel

Recently I found myself bogged down in writing my Novel. My first thought was that I had lost my ability to write. However, I seem to be able to spell and put a sentence together and my computer still functions. My fingers are flexible enough to hold a pen write on the reams of paper I have so what’s the problem, the lack of inspiration.

Inspiration

Inspiration doesn’t fall from the clouds nor is it mystical but it is a product of action.

When we feel inspired, it’s because we’ve been thinking and meditating on information we have taken into our minds through our senses. We take all of this information and then twist it, shake it, mold it and place it into a certain order in our minds that makes sense to us.

We then become inspired.

This process is action that produces inspiration.

roryckeel.com

Recycled Books


Recycled Books

by Natalie Bright

We took a detour off of Highway 380 last week on our way to Dallas to explore Recycled Books in Denton, Texas.

Rising above one corner of a charming and thriving downtown square in Denton, the former opera house is filled to the brim with previously owned entertainment. Yes, this building is old, and the musty smell of dust and yellowed pages only adds to the experience while exploring this 17,000 square foot store. You’ll discover shelf after shelf through row after row, as you twist and turn on three floors. Hand-lettered posters identify the genre section. Shelves are clearly labeled by topic with sub-headings, including a few topics you may not have even considered. They also have a rare book area, accessed by appointment and only if accompanied by a staff member.

The basement is all nonfiction, and they had an entire shelf of Colonial America to aide me with my current WIP research. I prefer first hand accounts and journals, and I was not disappointed.  My oldest son is drawn to those huge military history coffee table books, and his stack was as tall as mine. A few were several dollars, older publications a few dollars more, but we came away with two sacks of books with nothing priced over $10.

The basement houses a treasure of nonfiction books.

If you’re ever in the area, stop by Recycled Books in Denton. You might find a few treasures of your own.

For more information, visit their website: www.recycledbooks.com

To see pictures, visit my blog at www.nataliebright.com and click on the “Recycled Books” article.

Dear Diary


Outtakes 160

Dear Diary

By Cait Collins

Like most young ladies of my generation, I kept a diary. I’m sure the things I wrote were important. But what is important to a child of 12 or 13 may have little significance when the girl is 25, or 40 or 60. I’ve made every effort to go through all of my journals and destroy the writings I would not want others to see. After all, the purpose of a diary is to have a repository for the deepest secrets of the heart.

But what if I were to overlook the book with my most intimate thoughts? What if an enemy or the one I love most were to find those writings? What if the words were posted on Facebook?

This is your writing assignment. “I would just die if anyone ever saw this diary entry.” The entry may be an embarrassing moment or the darkest day in your life. And if you’ve never kept a journal, make something up. After all, we’re writers.