Chiasmus


Chiasmus

by Adam Huddleston

 

This week, I wanted to bring you another literary term: chiasmus. It is the use of two parallel phrases that are inverted in a sentence. For example: You can take the boy out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the boy. This is not to be confused with an oxymoron, which is the use of two contradictory terms, i.e. pretty ugly.

I know this is a short blog, but hopefully it will help you in your writing!

Somewhere Only We Know


Somewhere Only We Know

by Adam Huddleston

 

Several years ago, a group called Keane released a song entitled “Somewhere Only We Know”. The lyrics, while able to be interpreted many different ways, struck a chord with me (no pun intended). Being a writer, I felt that the song lent itself to a story, possibly in the fantasy genre. This is my attempt at such a story.

Each week, I am going to try to release a bit more of the tale. We’ll see how it goes. Enjoy!

*

Robert savored the cool dampness of the earth under his body. He sat with his arms stretched behind him, hands gently clinching the rich grass covering the hillside. A fragrant breeze played with the sparse tufts of grey hair that still clung to his scalp.

He smiled.

The wind’s scent was familiar; comforting. For some reason it reminded him of breakfast. This got him thinking about Ellen. No one could make coffee like his sweet Ellen.

Coffee.

“You want another cup of coffee?”

Robert blinked. He was sitting in his usual chair at the tiny kitchen table. A plate of half-finished scrambled eggs and toast stared up at him. The only light came from an eastern-facing window.

His wife repeated, “Another cup of coffee, hon?”

Whatcha Watchin’


Whatcha Watchin’

by Adam Huddleston

 

Last week I mentioned the book I’m currently reading. This week, I wanted to share with you what television shows I’m watching.

The main programs that my wife and I enjoy are “Better Call Saul” (which just ended their third season), “Fargo” (which is about to finish their third season), “The Walking Dead”, “The Next Food Network Star”, and on Netflix, “The Office”.

Literarily speaking, “Fargo” is probably the best written show of the bunch. The dialogue is fantastic, the plot twists and turns keep you on the proverbial edge of your seat, and the overall story telling is simply wonderful. “The Office” contains some of the funniest writing and loveable characters on television. I highly recommend both programs.

What are you watching?

Whatcha Readin’?


Whatcha Readin’?

by Adam Huddleston

 

I’m currently enjoying working my way through the graphic novel, “Watchmen”. If I recall correctly, this is the first of its kind that I’ve read. It takes a little getting used to (looking at the drawings in each panel as well as the writing), but it is well worth it.

Without giving too much away, “Watchmen” deals with the search for an individual that is murdering costumed heroes from the early-to-mid nineteen hundreds (basically, who watches over those that watch over us?). The story begins with a bang, but then meanders about for a few chapters. I’m about halfway through the story now and it is really starting to pick up its pace.

If you’re a fan of the fantasy/sci-fi genre, comic books, and/or graphic novels, I highly recommend giving “Watchmen” a try.

Red Herring


Red Herring

by Adam Huddleston

 

This week’s literary device is one that many if not most writers have at least heard of: red herring. It is defined as the use of a topic to deliberately mislead the reader or character in a story. Red herrings are often utilized in mystery or suspense to deter the audience from solving the plot.

It is often believed that a red herring must be false. This is not the case. A true fact may also be used to mislead the intended target. For example: Let’s say a police officer catches a thief. Said thief begins a long, sob story concerning how he needed the money to pay for food for his starving children. The thief’s story may or may not be true, but he is using it to distract the officer from the real point that he is guilty. The use of red herrings in your work can make it more engaging for your readers.

Happy writing!

Synesthesia


Synesthesia

by Adam Huddleston

 

This week’s literary term is: synesthesia. While it generally refers to a medical condition, as it pertains to writing, it is defined as a link between two or more of a character’s senses. Often seen in poetry, synesthesia is used to combine several senses, leading to a deeper understanding by the reader.

For example: “I immediately noticed the sharp smell of rubbing alcohol.” While sharp is a term usually connected to the sense of touch, here it is used with that of smell. Effective use of synesthesia can broaden your writing make the reading experience more enjoyable.

Happy writing!

Meiosis


Meiosis

by Adam Huddleston

 

This week’s literary term is: meiosis. In the field of biology, it refers to the division of one cell into gamete (sex) cells. In literature, it is defined as the use of understatement to make a specific point or highlight a situation.

For example, when the character Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet is mortally wounded, he states “ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch…” This understatement contrasts with the severity of his injury. Meiosis is often used to give an ironic effect.

Hopefully, you’ll be able to incorporate this into your written works. Happy writing!

Literary Terms


Literary Terms

by Adam Huddleston

 

Many weeks, the subject of my blog involves literary terms or devices. You may wonder, “Does Adam possess that great of an inventory of knowledge that he can spout out definitions and examples of these topics?”

I say, “Nay.” Allow me to impart the sources of my weekly knowledge.

Two excellent websites: www.literarydevices.net and www.literary-devices.com are full of excellent definitions and examples. Although the lists may not be exhaustive, for my intents and purposes, they definitely suffice. I hope these resources will help you in your craft.

Happy writing!

Diction


Diction

by Adam Huddleston

 

This week’s literary term is: diction. It can be roughly defined as an author’s word usage. Over time, a writer’s choice to use shorter or longer words, specific dialects, or even certain phrases, can distinguish them from their peers. For example, when attempting to affect a Shakespearian sound, an author may utilize familiar words from Old English such as thee, thy, and thou.

When analyzing my word usage, it seems that I prefer a mix of word length, southern dialects (surprise, surprise), and a lot of description regarding the setting’s temperature. I’m looking forward to honing my craft by altering my diction from time to time.

Happy writing!

Diction


Diction

by Adam Huddleston

 

This week’s literary term is: diction. It can be roughly defined as an author’s word usage. Over time, a writer’s choice to use shorter or longer words, specific dialects, or even certain phrases, can distinguish them from their peers. For example, when attempting to affect a Shakespearian sound, an author may utilize familiar words from Old English such as thee, thy, and thou.

When analyzing my word usage, it seems that I prefer a mix of word length, southern dialects (surprise, surprise), and a lot of description regarding the setting’s temperature. I’m looking forward to honing my craft by altering my diction from time to time.

Happy writing!