PRIORITIES


PRIORITIES

Lynnette Jalufka

This past year, I spent a lot of time writing projects in order to get my name out in public. My novel suffered as a result. I’m changing that in 2020. My first priority is my novel. I want to have it finished to market by the end of the year. There are two contests I may enter, but other that, I won’t get sidetracked by competitions or anthologies this time. This novel and the following books in this series are my heart. It’s time it receives my full attention. 

To complicate matters, since I will have short stories out come next year, I will need to have a professional online presence. This will start with social media with the goal of having my own website and blog in place by 2021. That means I must come up with content to fill all those outlets, which takes time, time away from my novel. It will require some planning to still work on my book. Marketing is important, but it means nothing if I don’t have anything to promote.

Figure out what your priorities are for the coming year. Should you write your heart or write for every little opportunity out there? How much time should you spend on promotion? Your year will run smoother if you plan now.   

 

Finding Time to Write


Finding Time to Write

By Adam Huddleston

One of the greatest barriers to an author is finding an appropriate time and place to write.  Our busy lives have us running all over creation running errands and seeing to the minutia of life.  Some writers require peace and quiet in order to crate.  Others can happily type away while the Apocalypse is happening all around them.

I’ve always felt deep inside that I leaned toward the former requirement.  I tend to be distracted rather easily and usually need quiet in order to write.  However, having a full-time job and being the father of five makes that extremely difficult.  Fortunately, since I basically stare at a computer monitor all day in the pharmacy, I am able to find time every once in awhile to jot down a few lines in Google docs.  From there, I can send them to myself or print them out if they’re complete.  

It may sound cliché, but every writer must find what environment works best for them.  I hope this blog helps in some small way.

Happy writing!

Goal Setting for Writers


Goal Setting for Writers

Natalie Bright

 

3 in 24:

Identify 3 times in a 24-hour period to Write.

For example:

  1. Wake-up one hour early and join the 5 am writers club.
  2. Skip lunch with coworkers and write only new words on WIP Monday-Thursday.
  3. Stay up late on Friday, Sat., and Sun. to work on edits or blogs.

Study your list. Can you visualize yourself accomplishing these tasks? Can you see yourself with pen in hand or typing at the keyboard at the times and places you’ve chosen?

Setting achievable goals equals success.

Thanks for Following our Blog

Thanks to all of you who have followed this blog, Wordsmithsix, during the past year. We really appreciate you. Sending out our best wishes that you achieve your writing goals in 2020!

WHATEVER WORKS


WHATEVER WORKS

Lynnette Jalufka

Stephen King writes 2,000 words a day. Debbie Macomber writes 5,000. Michael Crichton wrote 10,000. So what does this mean for you as you set your writing goals for next year? Keep in mind that these are bestselling authors who don’t have another job that takes up the majority of their day.

The trick is to set a goal that works for you. You want one that’s not so high you can never reach it. If you can write 2,000 words everyday and still hold down a separate eight-hour job plus meal and travel time, then good for you. Way to go! But if you’re like me, that goal is too high. I need to sleep. 

I use time instead of word counts to calculate my daily writing. My goal this year was to write one hour five days a week. When I wrote my hour, I put a sticker, usually a smiling sun, on the wall calendar in my office. If I reached my goal for the week, I put another sticker with an inspiring message on Sunday. It’s encouraging to see all those happy stickers shining back at me. 

In 2020, I’ve decided to change my goal since I have much I want to accomplish. I aim to write 10 hours a week. That’s a big challenge, but my novel is calling. 

Remember, however you decide to keep track of your writing, your goal must be attainable. The key is to write something every day. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once said, “Anything is better than stagnation.” His daily word count was 3,000.   

Finding Time to Write


Finding Time to Write

By Adam Huddleston

One of the greatest barriers to an author is finding an appropriate time and place to write.  Our busy lives have us running all over creation running errands and seeing to the minutia of life.  Some writers require peace and quiet in order to crate.  Others can happily type away while the Apocalypse is happening all around them.

I’ve always felt deep inside that I leaned toward the former requirement.  I tend to be distracted rather easily and usually need quiet in order to write.  However, having a full-time job and being the father of five makes that extremely difficult.  Fortunately, since I basically stare at a computer monitor all day in the pharmacy, I am able to find time every once in awhile to jot down a few lines in Google docs.  From there, I can send them to myself or print them out if they’re complete.  

It may sound cliché, but every writer must find what environment works best for them.  I hope this blog helps in some small way.

Happy writing!

2020 Goals: Traditional vs. Indie?


2020 Goals: Traditional vs. Indie?

Natalie Bright

 

Reach for the stars and snag a literary agent who will negotiate a deal with a Big House publishing company? Or go it alone and join the throng of independent authors who self-publish?

It’s a daunting decision, I know. All you want to do is to be left alone to write the story that’s in your head. But, readers are waiting! You have to make the first move.

We’ll be blogging about goal setting and productivity during the month of December so please share with your writer friends. Comment and let us know how your dreams, goals and how you plan to stay productive in 2020.

Option 1: Traditional Publishing

If you have a high concept book theme or genre, the urgency of publication is not an issue, and you are willing to relinquish ALL rights to said work, then Traditional Publishing is for you.

A literary agent will be needed to “shop” your manuscript to the five publishing houses which are closed to un-agented submissions. You no longer own rights to your characters or the stories you create. Dollars are well spent in attending conferences to network with agents and editors. Practice your pitch.

Are you willing to edit, in most cases make extreme changes to your work to meet the expectations of the agent and publishing house editor? This process takes years.

If published, your work has the potential to be promoted to readers all over the world with large first print runs and speaking gigs. This can open many doors and personal accolades of being a serious, professional author.

Option 2: Indie Author

If you have a polished manuscript ready to go, a clear idea of your target market and author platform, and a Type A personality that likes control, then becoming an Independent Author is the perfect fit. Although Independent is hardly the perfect term, because there are so many resources available to help you achieve your goals.

Dollars are well spent in hiring the professionals to do the work that you don’t want to learn. Become proficient on social media. Network, network and network. Join writers organizations, find a critique group, ask questions, and treat this like a business because it is. You’re the boss and the intellectual property creator.

PROMOTION

For either option learn everything you can about how to promote your work to readers. No one can read it, if they don’t know about it. This is a marathon.

Let’s get serious about reaching those goals. May you realize all of your personal dreams in the New Year.