Epigraph


Epigraph

by Adam Huddleston

In the past, I would blog concerning different literary devices.  I really enjoyed that and wanted to revisit some of those old techniques.  I’m not sure if I ever mentioned the “epigraph”, so here goes.

An epigraph is a quotation, song, poem, passage, etc. written by another author and inserted into the beginning of a larger section of writing such as a chapter or book.  The epigraph is meant to provide the reader with guidance on the overall theme is of what they are about to read.  Some examples include: 

Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay To mould me Man, did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me? — Paradise Lost, X, 743-45
(from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley)

If they give you ruled paper, write the other way. — Juan Ramón Jiménez
(from Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury)

Lawyers, I suppose, were children once. — Charles Lamb
(from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee)

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It’s A Book Event


It’s A Book Event

And You’re Invited!

Please help me celebrate the release of our new Anthology

OUR TIME ON ROUTE 66

Join me for a book signing event on historic Route 66

Saturday, December 1. — 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Lile Art Gallery

2719 SW 6th Avenue, Amarillo

Lile’s is home of the famous Cadilite jewelry, made from paint chips off the Cadillac ranch.

Scroll down for more about the book.

 

About the Book:

If you’re needing a unique gift or if you’re a fan of Route 66, this new anthology is for you!

OUR TIME ON ROUTE 66 tells of good times and bad, Love and heartache, from the past to beyond tomorrow, and all of them connected by one stop, the Tower Station and U-Drop Inn on Route 66.

It started as a dirt path connecting neighbors, communities, states and a nation. Route 66 was an overland route traveled by pioneers, migrant farmers and anyone going west looking for the American dream. From wagon ruts to an asphalt paved highway, it has connected generations of people.

Five unique short stories and novellas set on historic Route 66 in Texas.

A gripping story of family betrayal, deep despair, and a young girl’s courageous triumph. MAGGIE’S BETRAYAL by Natalie Bright

A young soldier leaves his new bride for war sharing their life through letters in this heartfelt story. WAITING by Rory C. Keel

A down-on-his-luck cowboy sees opportunity in a young widow’s neglected ranch in 1944 Texas. SUDDEN TURNS by Joe Nichols

A Cherokee Chief predicts Mora O’Hara’s future as she travels The Mother Road seeking closure after a career related tragedy. SHOWDOWN AT U-DROP INN by Cait Collins

Raylen Dickey learns the difference between her friends, lovers, and enemies. FEAR OF HEIGHTS by Nandy Ekle

The Writing Life Quotes


The Writing Life Quotes

Natalie Bright

 

“Making people believe the unbelievable is no trick; it’s work. … Belief and reader absorption come in the details: An overturned tricycle in the gutter of an abandoned neighborhood can stand for everything.”
—Stephen King (Writer’s Digest 
an interview with King in our May/June 2009 issue)

It’s A Book Event


It’s A Book Event

And You’re Invited!

Please help me celebrate the release of our new Anthology

OUR TIME ON ROUTE 66

Join me for a book signing event on historic Route 66

Saturday, December 1. — 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Lile Art Gallery

2719 SW 6th Avenue, Amarillo

Lile’s is home of the famous Cadilite jewelry, made from paint chips off the Cadillac ranch.

Scroll down for more about the book.

 

About the Book:

If you’re needing a unique gift or if you’re a fan of Route 66, this new anthology is for you!

OUR TIME ON ROUTE 66 tells of good times and bad, Love and heartache, from the past to beyond tomorrow, and all of them connected by one stop, the Tower Station and U-Drop Inn on Route 66.

It started as a dirt path connecting neighbors, communities, states and a nation. Route 66 was an overland route traveled by pioneers, migrant farmers and anyone going west looking for the American dream. From wagon ruts to an asphalt paved highway, it has connected generations of people.

Five unique short stories and novellas set on historic Route 66 in Texas.

A gripping story of family betrayal, deep despair, and a young girl’s courageous triumph. MAGGIE’S BETRAYAL by Natalie Bright

A young soldier leaves his new bride for war sharing their life through letters in this heartfelt story. WAITING by Rory C. Keel

A down-on-his-luck cowboy sees opportunity in a young widow’s neglected ranch in 1944 Texas. SUDDEN TURNS by Joe Nichols

A Cherokee Chief predicts Mora O’Hara’s future as she travels The Mother Road seeking closure after a career related tragedy. SHOWDOWN AT U-DROP INN by Cait Collins

Raylen Dickey learns the difference between her friends, lovers, and enemies. FEAR OF HEIGHTS by Nandy Ekle

Another Story: Step Two


Another Story: Step Two

by Adam Huddleston

Last week, I submitted the tagline for a new story.  This week, I’d like to expand it into a paragraph.  It’s a little clunky, and I know I used the word “mage” much too often, but I wanted to show what the expansion looks like.  

A clandestine mage infiltrates a magical cadre responsible for keeping an extra-dimensional portal closed.  After murdering all but one of the group, the portal opens, releasing several deadly creatures that destroy the village and enter the kingdom.  The surviving mage seeks out and finds the last man with magical powers (the secret mages brother), and he reluctantly agrees to help.  After his magical training, he travels to the portal to close it, but his mentor is killed before reaching their goal.  Digging deep within himself, the new mage defeats the creatures and seals the portal. 

Holiday Thoughts


Outtakes 364

Holiday Thoughts

By Cait Collins

 

Thanksgiving is two days away and Christmas will be here before we are ready. With so much going on I find myself making excuses for not working on my writing projects.  This year I have set a challenge for myself.  I will work on my projects each evening.  Even if it’s only thirty minutes or an hour, it will dedicate time to editing or writing at least a paragraph each day.

Enjoy the holidays, but do not neglect those projects.  It saves backtracking after the festivities have ended.

It’s A Book Event


It’s A Book Event

And You’re Invited!

Please help me celebrate the release of our new Anthology

OUR TIME ON ROUTE 66

Join me for a book signing event on historic Route 66

Saturday, December 1. — 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Lile Art Gallery

2719 SW 6th Avenue, Amarillo

Lile’s is home of the famous Cadilite jewelry, made from paint chips off the Cadillac ranch.

Scroll down for more about the book.

 

About the Book:

If you’re needing a unique gift or if you’re a fan of Route 66, this new anthology is for you!

OUR TIME ON ROUTE 66 tells of good times and bad, Love and heartache, from the past to beyond tomorrow, and all of them connected by one stop, the Tower Station and U-Drop Inn on Route 66.

It started as a dirt path connecting neighbors, communities, states and a nation. Route 66 was an overland route traveled by pioneers, migrant farmers and anyone going west looking for the American dream. From wagon ruts to an asphalt paved highway, it has connected generations of people.

Five unique short stories and novellas set on historic Route 66 in Texas.

A gripping story of family betrayal, deep despair, and a young girl’s courageous triumph. MAGGIE’S BETRAYAL by Natalie Bright

A young soldier leaves his new bride for war sharing their life through letters in this heartfelt story. WAITING by Rory C. Keel

A down-on-his-luck cowboy sees opportunity in a young widow’s neglected ranch in 1944 Texas. SUDDEN TURNS by Joe Nichols

A Cherokee Chief predicts Mora O’Hara’s future as she travels The Mother Road seeking closure after a career related tragedy. SHOWDOWN AT U-DROP INN by Cait Collins

Raylen Dickey learns the difference between her friends, lovers, and enemies. FEAR OF HEIGHTS by Nandy Ekle

The Writing Life Quotes


 

“Who wants to become a writer? And why? Because it’s the answer to everything. … It’s the streaming reason for living. To note, to pin down, to build up, to create, to be astonished at nothing, to cherish the oddities, to let nothing go down the drain, to make something, to make a great flower out of life, even if it’s a cactus.”
—Enid Bagnold

Another Story


Another Story

by Adam Huddleston

Several weeks ago, I began a blog series on the Snowflake Method.  I posted my progress on a story I was working on, and to tell you the truth, I just lost interest in the tale.  It’s still there, resting on the back burners with the motley crew of other stories that have seeped from my brain, but I wanted to try out some new content.  If you remember, step 1 is the tagline.

A baker must nurture his magical powers to close an extra-dimensional portal and save his kingdom.

What Did You See?


Outtakes 363

What Did You See?

By Cait Collins

 

 

Test your powers of observation.

You are standing in line at the bank.  Every teller is busy.  Each teller has five or six people in his line.  It’s nearly 5:00 P.M on Friday.  The lobby is warmer than usual.  The teller for your line is moving slowly.  You’re getting impatient.  Just when you start complaining about the sloppy service, the patron at the counter leaves.  The teller’s face is pale and her hands are shaking.  You place your deposit on the counter and put your palms flat on the polished wood counter top.  She hesitates, and says “Excuse me.  I’ll be right back.”  A few minutes pass and the bank manager comes to the window.  “I apologize for the inconvenience, but I need you to move to the window on your right.”  Not so fast, I’ve been waiting for half an hour.”  “Please cooperate.  The bank’s just been robbed.”

The police arrive and begin questioning the customers.  Put yourself in the shoes of the witnesses.  Answer the following questions from the point of view of the following patrons:  yourself, a harried young mother with three small children, and the teller.

 

What did you see?

Was the person in front of you male or female?

Height, build, hair color?

What was the suspect wearing?

Did you notice any jewelry, glasses?

Did you touch anything at the counter?

 

This really happened.  I was the person standing in line and getting impatient because I was running late for my shift at the Disney Store.  Not only did I give a statement to the police, the FBI interviewed me.  I could give them the gender, height, hair color, clothing, glasses, yes, I had touched the counter top.  The FBI agent showed me a picture of the suspect leaving the building. My description was accurate.  It’s been nearly 15 years and I still remember the look on the teller’s face and remember her apology for walking away from me when I came up to her window.  I can describe the teller and the suspect.  And I remember that “I don’t believe this is happening feeling.

Writers must be observant.  We must look around and really see the scene.  Do you go to the mall and watch the people?  A couple of hours after leaving the mall could you describe at least one person?  What did you smell? What did you hear?  Observing not only the place but also the sounds, scents, colors, and people allows us to recreate a similar scene in our stories. Observation empowers our work. Test yourself next time you’re out and about.  Look around. What do you see?