A Great Experience


A Pinch of Rodeo

By Joe R. Nichols

 

A Great Experience

I’ve never been paid to be a pick-up man at a rodeo.

My experience has only been at college practice sessions, or trying out horses.

When people watch a rodeo, the men who assist bronc riders safely to the ground, and clear the arena, mostly go unnoticed. If they’re doing a good job, there is no reason for the average spectator to pay any attention to their duties.

I’ve always wanted to be involved at the Cal Farley’s Boy’s Ranch. My wife and I have no children of our own, yet young kids are very important to us. I have personally seen how the sport of rodeo can change and effect lives for the better. A dear friend of mine has given me the opportunity to be a part of this great organization. J.B. asked me to help him pick-up at the practice sessions for the Labor Day Rodeo.

This is the biggest and most important event at the Boy’s Ranch for the whole year. The young women at Girls Town are also involved all the way.

I’m only there to try and help, not to take over or get in the way. J.B. is not there for any benefit for himself, only to help and improve the kid’s chances, in and out of the arena. That’s what I’d like to do as well. Surely, my knowledge of the rodeo events could effect someone in a positive way.

I’m honored to have been asked to help pick-up at the Labor Day Rodeo. I hope I do a good job and can live in the moment. These kids are phenomenal. They come from everywhere and anywhere, and they try harder than most kids.

I wish them the best, at this rodeo, and for the rest of their lives.

Count Down to the Wrangler NFR


A Pinch Of Rodeo
By Joe R. Nichols
Count Down to the Wrangler NFR
  

Trevor Brazile won his fourth Steer Roping Championship Nov. 9th & 10 at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, OK. Trailing Rocky Patterson of Pratt, KS, going in to the final go-round, Brazile tied the fastest steer of the 10 round finals with a smoking 9 seconds flat. He won four go-rounds in all, overtaking the lead by earning $26,462.

This title marks his 19th overall World Championship, tying him with “The Legend”, Guy Allen of Lovington, NM. A tie that will be broken in December.

For the All-Around Championship, Trevor’s winnings of $255,187, leads his closest competitor, Tuff Cooper, better than $120,000. Trevor has qualified for the NFR in tie down roping and heading, the only two-event cowboy at this year’s final. Cooper is certainly capable of winning over $120,000, but it won’t be enough to overcome what Trevor accumulates. This is the only title race that is a virtual lock, and Trevor Brazile will win his 11th All-Around and 20th World title. He is also a contender in his other two events for those titles as well, and could surpass 5 million in career winnings. Regardless, with a record twenty Championships, he is the most winning cowboy in PRCA history.

The Steer Wrestling is probably the closest contested event every year. Those guys are so evenly matched and tightly positioned together by the money standings. However, this year they are spread out a little more. The range goes from Casey Martin with $108,938, down to the 15th hole at $50,000. The top three have separated themselves somewhat from the rest with Trevor Knowles seven thousand back of Martin, and Pampa,TX native Matt Reeves eleven thousand back of Trevor.

It’s still anybody’s game when you consider each of the ten go-round pays nearly $19,000, and the average win will pay almost $50,000. Casey Martin has led all year long, but I have a feeling this is going to be the year for Trevor Knowles. He is physically awesome, and I believe his experience competing in his previous NFR’s are going to make the difference for him.

Thanks for reading. Next week I’ll make some more comments and predictions.

A Great Experience


A Pinch of Rodeo

By Joe R. Nichols

 

A Great Experience

I’ve never been paid to be a pick-up man at a rodeo.

My experience has only been at college practice sessions, or trying out horses.

When people watch a rodeo, the men who assist bronc riders safely to the ground, and clear the arena, mostly go unnoticed. If they’re doing a good job, there is no reason for the average spectator to pay any attention to their duties.

I’ve always wanted to be involved at the Cal Farley’s Boy’s Ranch. My wife and I have no children of our own, yet young kids are very important to us. I have personally seen how the sport of rodeo can change and effect lives for the better. A dear friend of mine has given me the opportunity to be a part of this great organization. J.B. asked me to help him pick-up at the practice sessions for the Labor Day Rodeo.

This is the biggest and most important event at the Boy’s Ranch for the whole year. The young women at Girls Town are also involved all the way.

I’m only there to try and help, not to take over or get in the way. J.B. is not there for any benefit for himself, only to help and improve the kid’s chances, in and out of the arena. That’s what I’d like to do as well. Surely, my knowledge of the rodeo events could effect someone in a positive way.

I’m honored to have been asked to help pick-up at the Labor Day Rodeo. I hope I do a good job and can live in the moment. These kids are phenomenal. They come from everywhere and anywhere, and they try harder than most kids.

I wish them the best, at this rodeo, and for the rest of their lives.

A Pinch of Rodeo – Las Vegas Moment


A Pinch of Rodeo

By Joe R. Nichols

 

Las Vegas Moment 

It was Sunday before the last performance of the National Finals Rodeo. I won’t pretend to remember what year. I have a terrible memory.

We were there early and it was a nice warm day. Sunshine, music, and friends, kept us outside the Thomas and Mack until performance time. I happened to start up a conversation with a fellow from Los Angeles. I think he was about my age, and I believe he was a dentist. He showed me an autographed picture of Billy Etbauer. It was a great shot of Billy from the previous NFR on a paint horse called Rio Bravo, which set the arena record score. He held that picture like it was an ancient heirloom worth millions of dollars.

The story he told about getting it autographed is worth repeating. Billy and a few other cowboys were at the autograph table in the trade show. This man stood in line for 45 minutes, but ran out of time because of previous plans for dinner with friends. He was so disappointed. This was a planned goal of his before he left home, not something he decided to do after he got there.

He knew that sometimes the cowboys would come up to a certain section of the corridor after their event. He brought the picture with him to the rodeo. Sure enough, there was Billy, but there were friends all around him and he looked to be busy visiting. Not wanting to impose or interrupt, the dentist stood back, and held the picture up facing Billy. It took a while, but Billy happened to see the picture and recognized it. He immediately walked over to him. “Would you like me to sign that?” he asked.

I can’t tell you how much that meant to this guy. He was so impressed that Billy would leave his friends to sign a picture for a complete stranger, and take time to visit with him.

I wasn’t the least bit surprised, I just wish I could remember to tell Billy this story.