Kids and Books


Outtakes 223

Kids and Books

By Cait Collins

I’ve really tried to keep causes out of my blogs, but I hope you will indulge me this week. I realize times have changed, but as we see academic scores dropping and kids having trouble excelling in school, I have come to believe we have an issue with reading. I see kids being held back in school because their reading skills are not where they should be. They are not dumb children; they simply can’t read well.

I grew up in an environment where reading was encouraged. My folks bought the Grolier Encyclopedia, Book of Knowledge, and ChildCraft for us. They bought the books on a payment plan because they wanted us to have easy access to information. I remember Mom or Dad gathering us in the big chair and reading to us. As I got older and could read on my own, I would spend hours reading and studying these volumes.

These days books are not always present in the home. Often the family budget does not stretch to purchasing books. And if parents are not readers, it could be difficult for a child to see the need to read. Unfortunately, the child suffers because the inability to read well slows the learning process. For this reason, I support efforts to get books into a child’s hands.

One of my favorite programs is Toys for Tots. Every Christmas, the Barnes and Noble Store in Amarillo selects books for kids of all ages. The titles are suggestions for customers who wish to purchase books for the toy drive. Or the patrons may prefer to browse the shelves for some of their childhood favorites. Book donations are also accepted by the Evelyn Richards Foundation, a local charitable group that works to provide coats and Christmas for children in our area. It may not seem like a big deal to those of us who grew up reading, but giving a child a book of his own may be the beginning of new adventures and better learning opportunities.

Why not volunteer for Story Hour at your local library or bookstore? Maybe we could mentor in the local schools. As writers, we should be at the forefront of supporting efforts to put books in the home and in schools. Maybe we can’t change the whole world, but at least we can make an inroad in our corner of it.

 

Kids and Books


Outtakes 223

Kids and Books

By Cait Collins

I’ve really tried to keep causes out of my blogs, but I hope you will indulge me this week. I realize times have changed, but as we see academic scores dropping and kids having trouble excelling in school, I have come to believe we have an issue with reading. I see kids being held back in school because their reading skills are not where they should be. They are not dumb children; they simply can’t read well.

I grew up in an environment where reading was encouraged. My folks bought the Grolier Encyclopedia, Book of Knowledge, and ChildCraft for us. They bought the books on a payment plan because they wanted us to have easy access to information. I remember Mom or Dad gathering us in the big chair and reading to us. As I got older and could read on my own, I would spend hours reading and studying these volumes.

These days books are not always present in the home. Often the family budget does not stretch to purchasing books. And if parents are not readers, it could be difficult for a child to see the need to read. Unfortunately, the child suffers because the inability to read well slows the learning process. For this reason, I support efforts to get books into a child’s hands.

One of my favorite programs is Toys for Tots. Every Christmas, the Barnes and Noble Store in Amarillo selects books for kids of all ages. The titles are suggestions for customers who wish to purchase books for the toy drive. Or the patrons may prefer to browse the shelves for some of their childhood favorites. Book donations are also accepted by the Evelyn Richards Foundation, a local charitable group that works to provide coats and Christmas for children in our area. It may not seem like a big deal to those of us who grew up reading, but giving a child a book of his own may be the beginning of new adventures and better learning opportunities.

Why not volunteer for Story Hour at your local library or bookstore? Maybe we could mentor in the local schools. As writers, we should be at the forefront of supporting efforts to put books in the home and in schools. Maybe we can’t change the whole world, but at least we can make an inroad in our corner of it.

 

Kids and Books


Outtakes 223

Kids and Books

By Cait Collins

I’ve really tried to keep causes out of my blogs, but I hope you will indulge me this week. I realize times have changed, but as we see academic scores dropping and kids having trouble excelling in school, I have come to believe we have an issue with reading. I see kids being held back in school because their reading skills are not where they should be. They are not dumb children; they simply can’t read well.

I grew up in an environment where reading was encouraged. My folks bought the Grolier Encyclopedia, Book of Knowledge, and ChildCraft for us. They bought the books on a payment plan because they wanted us to have easy access to information. I remember Mom or Dad gathering us in the big chair and reading to us. As I got older and could read on my own, I would spend hours reading and studying these volumes.

These days books are not always present in the home. Often the family budget does not stretch to purchasing books. And if parents are not readers, it could be difficult for a child to see the need to read. Unfortunately, the child suffers because the inability to read well slows the learning process. For this reason, I support efforts to get books into a child’s hands.

One of my favorite programs is Toys for Tots. Every Christmas, the Barnes and Noble Store in Amarillo selects books for kids of all ages. The titles are suggestions for customers who wish to purchase books for the toy drive. Or the patrons may prefer to browse the shelves for some of their childhood favorites. Book donations are also accepted by the Evelyn Richards Foundation, a local charitable group that works to provide coats and Christmas for children in our area. It may not seem like a big deal to those of us who grew up reading, but giving a child a book of his own may be the beginning of new adventures and better learning opportunities.

Why not volunteer for Story Hour at your local library or bookstore? Maybe we could mentor in the local schools. As writers, we should be at the forefront of supporting efforts to put books in the home and in schools. Maybe we can’t change the whole world, but at least we can make an inroad in our corner of it.

 

PEN TO WIN!


PEN TO WIN!

With the precision of a surgeon’s hand, the written word can touch the human heart. The arched and looped letters of the alphabet skillfully arranged can fill the mind or thrill the soul.

Like a machine that transcends the barriers of time and space, the passages of a story are able carry the reader through the ages, both past and future. The words on every page turned reveals to the reader grand and exotic far-away places or the dark areas that are hidden within themselves.

The writing of the wise often compels the strong to see their own weaknesses and flaws, while the weak can learn to be strong with the same words. Yes, the pen is truly mighty.

In the early 1800’s, a young child by the name of Edward wore the label of a neurotic child. Pawned from one boarding school to another after his father’s death, he discovered the craft of writing. Encouraged to publish a small work of poetry at the age of fifteen, he went on to publish many famous works. The name of this young boy was Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

In 1839, this English politician, poet, playwright, and novelist coined the phrase “the pen is mightier than the sword,” in his play Richelieu.

So where do you begin? You start with From Pen to Win!”

This is a special orientation session for first-time Frontiers in Writing Conference attendees to explain what to expect and answer all of your concerns. It will be held  Thursday, June 28 at Barnes and Noble, starting a 7:30 P.M., located at 2415 Soncy Road in Amarillo, TX.

You’ll walk into the FiW conference on Friday feeling confident and prepared to begin your writing journey.

Rory C. Keel

PEN TO WIN!


PEN TO WIN!

With the precision of a surgeon’s hand, the written word can touch the human heart. The arched and looped letters of the alphabet skillfully arranged can fill the mind or thrill the soul.

Like a machine that transcends the barriers of time and space, the passages of a story are able carry the reader through the ages, both past and future. The words on every page turned reveals to the reader grand and exotic far-away places or the dark areas that are hidden within themselves.

The writing of the wise often compels the strong to see their own weaknesses and flaws, while the weak can learn to be strong with the same words. Yes, the pen is truly mighty.

In the early 1800’s, a young child by the name of Edward wore the label of a neurotic child. Pawned from one boarding school to another after his father’s death, he discovered the craft of writing. Encouraged to publish a small work of poetry at the age of fifteen, he went on to publish many famous works. The name of this young boy was Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

In 1839, this English politician, poet, playwright, and novelist coined the phrase “the pen is mightier than the sword,” in his play Richelieu.

So where do you begin? You start with From Pen to Win!”

This is a special orientation session for first-time Frontiers in Writing Conference attendees to explain what to expect and answer all of your concerns. It will be held  Thursday, June 28 at Barnes and Noble, starting a 7:30 P.M., located at 2415 Soncy Road in Amarillo, TX.

You’ll walk into the FiW conference on Friday feeling confident and prepared to begin your writing journey.

Rory C. Keel

PEN TO WIN!


PEN TO WIN!

With the precision of a surgeon’s hand, the written word can touch the human heart. The arched and looped letters of the alphabet skillfully arranged can fill the mind or thrill the soul.

Like a machine that transcends the barriers of time and space, the passages of a story are able carry the reader through the ages, both past and future. The words on every page turned reveals to the reader grand and exotic far-away places or the dark areas that are hidden within themselves.

The writing of the wise often compels the strong to see their own weaknesses and flaws, while the weak can learn to be strong with the same words. Yes, the pen is truly mighty.

In the early 1800’s, a young child by the name of Edward wore the label of a neurotic child. Pawned from one boarding school to another after his father’s death, he discovered the craft of writing. Encouraged to publish a small work of poetry at the age of fifteen, he went on to publish many famous works. The name of this young boy was Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

In 1839, this English politician, poet, playwright, and novelist coined the phrase “the pen is mightier than the sword,” in his play Richelieu.

So where do you begin? You start with From Pen to Win!”

This is a special orientation session for first-time Frontiers in Writing Conference attendees to explain what to expect and answer all of your concerns. It will be held  Thursday, June 28 at Barnes and Noble, starting a 7:30 P.M., located at 2415 Soncy Road in Amarillo, TX.

You’ll walk into the FiW conference on Friday feeling confident and prepared to begin your writing journey.

Rory C. Keel

PEN TO WIN!


PEN TO WIN!

With the precision of a surgeon’s hand, the written word can touch the human heart. The arched and looped letters of the alphabet skillfully arranged can fill the mind or thrill the soul.

Like a machine that transcends the barriers of time and space, the passages of a story are able carry the reader through the ages, both past and future. The words on every page turned reveals to the reader grand and exotic far-away places or the dark areas that are hidden within themselves.

The writing of the wise often compels the strong to see their own weaknesses and flaws, while the weak can learn to be strong with the same words. Yes, the pen is truly mighty.

In the early 1800’s, a young child by the name of Edward wore the label of a neurotic child. Pawned from one boarding school to another after his father’s death, he discovered the craft of writing. Encouraged to publish a small work of poetry at the age of fifteen, he went on to publish many famous works. The name of this young boy was Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

In 1839, this English politician, poet, playwright, and novelist coined the phrase “the pen is mightier than the sword,” in his play Richelieu.

So where do you begin? You start with From Pen to Win!”

This is a special orientation session for first-time Frontiers in Writing Conference attendees to explain what to expect and answer all of your concerns. It will be held  Thursday, June 28 at Barnes and Noble, starting a 7:30 P.M., located at 2415 Soncy Road in Amarillo, TX.

You’ll walk into the FiW conference on Friday feeling confident and prepared to begin your writing journey.

Rory C. Keel