8 Best Quotes on Writing from FiW’12


8 Best Quotes on Writing from FiW’12

By Natalie Bright

Based on the sessions I attended during Frontiers in Writing 2012 in Amarillo this past June, here are a few of my favorite quotes:

  1. “The work of writing: a writer writes. Save the make believe for your books, not your excuses.” Jodi Thomas, NYT and USA Today Bestselling Author http://www.jodithomas.com
  1. “Keep it real, keep it authentic, keep it accurate, keep it human.” Jeff C. Campbell, former law enforcement and detective, now author and historian.
  1. “Every book has to have a heart which the reader will find beating in the central drama.” Hilary Sares
  1. “Writing comes from blue BIC pens. That’s what I wrote with beginning in 7th grade, and that’s what I still use.” Nandy Ekle, multi-award winning horror author, blogging at http://www.wordsmithsix.wordpress.com
  1. “Only tell the reader what they need to know at that point in your story. They don’t need a lot of back-story in the first chapter. Instead, sprinkle it throughout your book.” Candace Havens http://www.candacehavens.com
  1. “My stories come from who I am and where I come from, not from a course that is taught.” John Erickson, prolific author of Hank the Cowdog series.
  1. “The barriers to getting published are way lower today.” Chris Stewart, Attorney
  1. “Texas writers get to the heart of the matter. You have clarity of situations that are  very rare.” Hilary Sares, former Kensington acquiring editor, now writer and freelance editor.

Natalie Bright

www.nataliebright.com

GO FOR THE OUTRAGEOUS



GO FOR THE OUTRAGEOUS

By Natalie Bright

Hilary Sares, freelance editor and ghostwriter, spoke at the recent Frontiers in Writing Conference this summer and encouraged us to go for intensity and outrageousness in all of our writing. “Stories can take on a life of their own and don’t be afraid to spin your story into something new without loosing sight of the craft,” Sares told us. The example she gave is a self-pub runaway bestseller by John Locke called SAVING RACHEL, the story of what happens when killers force a man to choose between his wife and his mistress…and the one he rejects must die. It’s different, it’s a new premise and readers loved it. She reminded us that structure must include magic and plot. “Write from your soul, write from your heart, and write your life experience,” Hilary said. If the topic means something to you, you will reach people in a direct way. The trick is to put yourself into it and leave yourself out of it. One of the biggests problems she sees with newbie writers is the intrusion of clever asides. The author must be invisible. In today’s market we see larger story arcs where individual characters can be spun off into their own series. “The writing is tight, fast moving and stripped down,” Hilary said. “You are a pro. Be willing to change and edit.” She encouraged us to work our contacts, be shameless in promoting ourselves, and always keep the magic in mind.

Natalie Bright

www.nataliebright.com