Chasing the Creative Impossible


Chasing the Creative Impossible

by Natalie Bright

www.nataliebright.com

Time.

The elusive part of our lives that all creatives tend to never have enough of, whether you’re firing ceramics, designing jewelry, painting with oils, gluing scrapbook pages or crafting stories with words. There comes a time when chasing your passion is like taking a slow, tortuous swim in a deep, murky pool of self-guilt. The reality is that most of us won’t realize world notoriety.

People Who Inspire You

I just returned from a writing conference where, of course, the topic of making time to write was discussed. Everyone struggles to follow their passion. Spending time with imaginative people helps me bring my ambition into focus. It makes my goals list seem more realistic and achievable, because I meet others who have accomplished what I dream about. Feeling exhausted, rejuvenated, and itching to apply what I’d learned to my waiting manuscript, the drive home took forever. I couldn’t wait to get my fingers on the keyboard again.

What Creative People Do

This weekend at the Enid Writers Group in Oklahoma, Spur Award winning author, Dusty Richards said, “Things will be tough in your life, but when you get to the other side, you still gotta write that book, or do whatever it is that drives you. Just do it.”

Something from Nothing

I think this applies to anyone who chases that elusive need to bring into being what they alone can visualize. People who are driven by an unseen creative muse can’t explain the why. At some point, it’s time to stop providing the excuses, the clarification, or the justification to others. At some point, all that’s left is the doing.

Dig deeper, keep going, just keep writing.

Note: Dusty Richards is author of over 100 books and countless short stories, and currently serves as President of the Western Writers of America. His Brynes Family Ranch Western series is a fan favorite, published by Pinnacle Books. www.dustyrichards.com

Happy Blog-iversary to us!


Happy Blog-iversary to us! 

We’re Celebrating the Big 1!

By Natalie Bright

We are a diverse group of writers actively writing and critique together. We started WordsmithSix Blog on August 1, 2011 with the goal to share our love of the written word.

I have to admit that I was very reluctant to start blogging, mainly because of the commitment. I’m of the opinion that if you volunteer to do something, you follow it through to the end and you give it your all. I wasn’t sure if I had enough topics on writing, but I have to admit it’s been fun, and there are a few things about blogging that surprised me…

Blogging Surprises

1) Exercise that writing muscle. Stuck on your WIP? Write a 500 word blog and just get your words out there. Don’t focus on the number of hits. Focus on the craft of words, make it your very best, then go back and tackle that 100,000 word novel.

2) Develop your “write brain” and your “idea eye”. You’ll begin to see ideas for posts everywhere, and eventually conversations, sights, sounds, tastes will give you more ideas for blogs, articles, stories, characters, settings. The overload is wonderful.

3) Deadline looming, means you must get something written no matter what or you’ll let your critique partners down. They’re just as busy as you are, and they don’t want to hear excuses.  Just do it.  You’ll turn into dedicated writer who can consistently produce new material and meet a deadline.

3) Creative people are inspiring, and it’s fun to be involved in a group effort.

4) People are nice. I’ve made wonderful connections on Facebook and Twitter and Pinterest. And vice versa, I’ve discovered a lot of talented writers and their books through social media. There’s a whole world out there of interesting people. Learning about the things they are passionate about is interesting, and being part of a vibrant community is fun and stimulating.

5) Focus, Focus, Focus. If you’ll notice, the most popular blogs are based around a common theme whether that be cooking, marketing, history, home decor, modern mommy’s, politics, etc. Writing a complete novel works in much the same way. You must have that common theme running throughout which ties your plot and characters together.  Establish your blog around a common theme rather than random posts, and when you post, make it the best. The most popular blogs have built that huge audience over a long time through quality and consistent posts.

Thank you for following us at WordsmithSix!

by Natalie Bright

http://www.nataliebright.com