R.I.P Brain


POST CARDS FROM THE MUSE

R.I.P Brain

By Nandy Ekle

The alarm rings at a mythical a.m. time. You rub your eyes and roll yourself to a sitting position. Then you hobble to the bathroom with one eye partially open. After your bath/shower and all your other bathroom duties are done, you style your hair, apply your make up, and head to your car.

The sun finally peeks over the horizon just as the traffic thickens and slows. You turn into the parking lot and race for the space closest to the door. As you trudge into the office the sun turns up the heat and your keys twist on your finger.

The computer is sulky and the programs are glitchy. The requests you deal with are confusing and you’re far behind where you should be in your duties.

By the time you get home your characters are screaming for attention. But you still have to prepare a meal and clean up. When the time comes for you to sit and talk with your characters, they have gone to bed.

Welcome to brain dead exhaustion. How in the world do we continue to write in this state? One thing we can do is to read the last couple of pages of the last thing we wrote. This will usually get the voice whispering again. Another thing we can do is read a few pages of a book we enjoy. This also turns on our creative juices. Deep cleansing breaths of oxygen, and maybe a few calisthenic exercises to get the blood to our brains. Set a word count goal. try your hand at some free verse writing.

If none of that works, start a new story. But whatever you do, write SOMETHING.

Congratulations. You have just received a post card from the muse.

Passing Time


POST CARDS FROM THE MUSE

Passing Time

This room is gray, gray as in dull, colorless non-white. Drab walls and drab carpet, buff colored desks and glass windows letting in the gray light from the overcast sky.

Against one wall is a black metal book shelf holding numerous books of different sizes, colors fonts and genres. There is a space between two books in the middle of the shelf. This space is the exactly the size of another book, which is not in its place. It is missing.

As I look closer a the titles, I see that the owner has kept the books in order by titles in their various series. I wonder which title is missing and where it could be.

This is an illustration of what to write when you don’t know what to write. Start describing a room in as intricate detail as you can. Every single time I’ve done this exercise, I have seen sudden threads of stories begin to show up, and before I know what has happened, I have a plot and a character.

Congratulations. You have just received a post card from the muse.

Nandy Ekle